Policies

Public-Private Joint Energy Welfare Project

Date 2017-06-28 Category Environment Updater ssunha
Writer
Hyungseok Yoo
Affiliation
Environmental Policy Division
Date
2017-06-28
Last Update
2017-06-28

Background: Challenges & Objectives

BACKGROUND


Approximately 10.3% of Seoul’s population (360,000 households) is classified as “energy poor,” a term referring to individuals who spend at least 10% of their income on heating and cooling. In the lowest income quantile, 69.3% are energy poor. Being energy poor and less likely to receive energy benefits is the biggest problem facing lower income households. Energy poor households are particularly vulnerable to adverse weather conditions (e.g. heat/cold waves) caused by climate change because of their lack of access to basic heating or cooling facilities.

An energy usage survey conducted in Seoul in 2016, targeting 4,671 low-income households that were national basic livelihood security recipients, revealed that one out of 10 of the households (9.5%) experienced significant hardship from cold and hot weather because of a lack of proper heating and cooling. Notably, 38.5% of survey participants lived in basement or semi-basement housing that had little natural light or ventilation. Considering that climate change will intensify heat and cold waves, a support system is essential for low-income households.

Actions& Implementation

ACTIONS

The energy welfare project was implemented by providing various types of direct and indirect support for low-income households. The characteristics of local societies, participating companies and recipients were taken into consideration.
The total budget size was approximately KRW 5.5 billion (January 2015 ~ December 2016) and was used in the following ways: approximately KRW 600 million was used for beneficial energy-sharing corporate activities and the Citizen Energy Welfare Fund, approximately KRW 2.2 billion for the Repairs of Hope project (KRW 1.2 billion in 2015, KRW 1 billion in 2016), and approximately KRW 2.7 billion for cultivating/selecting energy planners and energy welfare workers (KRW 15.75 million in 2015, KRW 11.55 million in 2016). The budget was secured through agreements between the SMG and private sector entities (participation in beneficial energy-sharing corporate activities, Citizen Energy Welfare Fund, monetary donations).
The target base of this project—low-income individuals—contributed by directly participating. A total of 180 energy planners and energy social workers have been trained (110 in 2015, 70 in 2016): these individuals are currently conducting inspections of energy usage and the living environments of approximately 1,300 low-income households and local children’s welfare centers that are in dire need of energy welfare. Energy-vulnerable individuals continue to contribute in SMG’s energy welfare projects in other ways too, providing energy conservation consulting services and various forms of housing repairs/construction.

Results & Evaluation

  • - A housing repair fee was provided to 1,295 households in 2015 through Repairs of Hope project. A total of 1,050 households received support in 2016
  • - Approximately 2,400 lights in outdoor markets, local children’s welfare centers and low-income households were changed to LED lights.
  • - Direct repairs were made to approximately 100 low-income households (e.g. windshield, insulation, Cool Roof).
  • - Approximately 1,600 mini solar panels were provided to residents of rented apartments and low-income households in run-down districts.
  • - Funding was provided for 10,000 sets of winter-use long underwear, 10,000 sets of summer underwear, 200 insulation tents.
  • - A status survey was conducted on the living environments and energy usage of approximately 1,300 low-income households and local children’s welfare centers that are in dire need of energy welfare.
  • - In 2015, 50 individuals gained jobs in energy-related areas. Also, five local cooperatives, three social cooperatives and four non-profit private organizations were founded. All of these organizations are consistently contributing to the energy welfare of low-income groups.

Expectancy effects & Need for Improvement

The energy welfare project was implemented by providing various types of direct and indirect support for low-income households. The characteristics of local societies, participating companies and recipients were taken into consideration.

The total budget size was approximately KRW 5.5 billion (January 2015 ~ December 2016) and was used in the following ways: approximately KRW 600 million was used for beneficial energy-sharing corporate activities and the Citizen Energy Welfare Fund, approximately KRW 2.2 billion for the Repairs of Hope project (KRW 1.2 billion in 2015, KRW 1 billion in 2016), and approximately KRW 2.7 billion for cultivating/selecting energy planners and energy welfare workers (KRW 15.75 million in 2015, KRW 11.55 million in 2016). The budget was secured through agreements between the SMG and private sector entities (participation in beneficial energy-sharing corporate activities, Citizen Energy Welfare Fund, monetary donations).

The target base of this project—low-income individuals—contributed by directly participating. A total of 180 energy planners and energy social workers have been trained (110 in 2015, 70 in 2016): these individuals are currently conducting inspections of energy usage and the living environments of approximately 1,300 low-income households and local children’s welfare centers that are in dire need of energy welfare. Energy-vulnerable individuals continue to contribute in SMG’s energy welfare projects in other ways too, providing energy conservation consulting services and various forms of housing repairs/construction.

Department / Contact

  • Global Urban Partnership Division, Seoul Metropolitan Government   /  02-2133-5272  /  policyshare@seoul.go.kr

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